Total Drek

Or, the thoughts of several frustrated intellectuals on Sociology, Gaming, Science, Politics, Science Fiction, Religion, and whatever the hell else strikes their fancy. There is absolutely no reason why you should read this blog. None. Seriously. Go hit your back button. It's up in the upper left-hand corner of your browser... it says "Back." Don't say we didn't warn you.

Monday, March 08, 2010

Get your shit together.

We've all had them: those annoying students who arrive to class late, leave early, fall asleep during lectures, and step out of tests so that they can get a big gulp from the local 7-11.* We put up with this bad behavior largely because it comes with the academic territory. Sometimes, though, our less than ideal students choose to chastise us for not allowing them to be even more less than ideal. And sometimes, just sometimes, one of us responds in a way so beautiful, you just have to be impressed. This is one of those times:





I have no idea if Scott Galloway is taking and heat from his department over this. If so, I for one just want to commend him for his upholding of academic standards, his candor, and his eloquence. And for those of you at work who can't take the time to listen to the above, take a look at the text version of the story on NPR. The short version, though, is as follows: student comes to class an hour late, professor asks student to leave, student e-mails professor some ways that he (the professor) could improve his demeanor, professor responds:

Thanks for the feedback. I, too, would like to offer some feedback: Get your $%^* together.

There is a baseline level of decorum that we expect of tomorrow's business leaders: getting a good job, working long hours, keeping your skills relevant, navigating the politics of an organization, finding a life-work balance. These are all really hard.

In contrast, respecting institutions, having manners, demonstrating a level of humility, these are all relatively easy. Get the easy stuff right.

In and of themselves, they will not make you successful. However, not possessing them will hold you back, and you will not achieve your potential, which you must have in spades. It's not too late.

Again, thanks for the feedback.


You go, Scott.


* This last bit is not a joke. It is, in fact, a true story.

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4 Comments:

Anonymous socygirl said...

Drek!

I don't know whether you got your hands on the Ray Comfort edited Origin of the Species, but I just did.

They were handing them out today on my (Australian) university campus.

You want it?

It's yours.

Tuesday, March 09, 2010 2:30:00 AM  
Blogger Drek said...

socygirl:

Holy shit! Seriously? You managed to get your hands on a copy? And in Australia no less? I didn't even know they were doing a book drop on that continent!

Well, if you don't want it, I sure do! Drop me an e-mail (drek_the_uninteresting@hotmail.com) and we'll try to work something out. And be thinking about what reward you'd like- I did promise to try to be as flexible as possible.

Tuesday, March 09, 2010 8:26:00 AM  
Anonymous socygurl said...

I just emailed you. Yep, I'm serious, legit and for real. It's on my desk as I type this.

Tuesday, March 09, 2010 2:06:00 PM  
Blogger Thunder Rabbit said...

According to http://doanie.wordpress.com/2010/02/23/mean-professor-tells-student/, the full (name-redacted) email response was this:

xxxx:

Thanks for the feedback. I, too, would like to offer some feedback.

Just so I’ve got this straight…you started in one class, left 15-20 minutes into it (stood up, walked out mid-lecture), went to another class (walked in 20 minutes late), left that class (again, presumably, in the middle of the lecture), and then came to my class. At that point (walking in an hour late) I asked you to come to the next class which “bothered” you.

Correct?

You state that, having not taken my class, it would be impossible to know our policy of not allowing people to walk in an hour late. Most risk analysis offers that in the face of substantial uncertainty, you opt for the more conservative path or hedge your bet (e.g., do not show up an hour late until you know the professor has an explicit policy for tolerating disrespectful behavior, check with the TA before class, etc.). I hope the lottery winner that is your recently crowned Monday evening Professor is teaching Judgement and Decision Making or Critical Thinking.

In addition, your logic effectively means you cannot be held accountable for any code of conduct before taking a class. For the record, we also have no stated policy against bursting into show tunes in the middle of class, urinating on desks or taking that revolutionary hair removal system for a spin. However, xxxx, there is a baseline level of decorum (i.e., manners) that we expect of grown men and women who the admissions department have deemed tomorrow’s business leaders.

xxxx, let me be more serious for a moment. I do not know you, will not know you and have no real affinity or animosity for you. You are an anonymous student who is now regretting the send button on his laptop. It’s with this context I hope you register pause…REAL pause xxxx and take to heart what I am about to tell you:

xxxx, get your shit together.

Getting a good job, working long hours, keeping your skills relevant, navigating the politics of an organization, finding a live/work balance…these are all really hard, xxxx. In contrast, respecting institutions, having manners, demonstrating a level of humility…these are all (relatively) easy. Get the easy stuff right xxxx. In and of themselves they will not make you successful. However, not possessing them will hold you back and you will not achieve your potential which, by virtue of you being admitted to Stern, you must have in spades. It’s not too late xxxx…

Again, thanks for the feedback.

Professor Galloway

Tuesday, April 09, 2013 3:52:00 PM  

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